8 best foods for brain health

8 best foods for brain health

spinach

• Spinach is particularly high in carotenoid antioxidants, including beta-carotene and lutein.

• One study found that middle-aged participants with higher levels of lutein had neurological responses that were more on par with younger individuals.

• Carotenoids, the yellow, orange and red pigments found in many antioxidant fruits and vegetables, help ward off accelerated oxidative damage to brain cells.

soybean

• Eating protein is not only beneficial for building lean muscle, but it is also a potential way to delay brain decline and slow the onset of dementia.

• Adult men and women who ate more protein than carbohydrates over several years had lower scores in hesitant cognitive performance.

• You can soak whole soybeans, cook them, leave them to ferment, and then prepare them in the form of a pancake. Eating them will give you an adequate share of the proteins needed for healthy cells.

avocado

• Found a study published in the journal "Nutrients" People who ate an avocado daily for 6 months experienced significant improvements in memory and problem-solving efficiency.

• The investigators attributed the benefit to the high bioavailable levels of the antioxidant lutein in the cream fruit.

• Avocado is also rich in other elements like monounsaturated fats, folic acid, and fiber that can prevent your brain from aging.

matcha

• Matcha is derived from the tea plant made from shade-grown leaves that are ground into a fine powder.

• Contains nutrients and antioxidants that protect the brain, including flavonoids and phenols.

• Green tea and matcha provide a unique amino acid called L-theanine, which in higher amounts may be associated with cognitive improvements, including better performance on memory tasks.

canned sardines

• Sardines are one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which some research suggests may help slow age-related cognitive decline.

• Find an investigation published in a magazine "Nutrients" In a study of 6,587 adults, consumption of fish, including sardines and salmon, and eating moderate omega-3 fats from marine sources, was associated with a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms.

• Psychiatrist Bonnie J. Kaplan says: "The cell walls of our brains require healthy fats, including omega-3s, to function optimally"Air hostess: "We don’t yet know the ideal amount of seafood needed for brain health, but a good suggestion is to eat two servings of fatty fish per week.".

Canned sardines are a good source of"Vitamin D" Also, a serving (100 grams) provides 193 IU, or 24 percent of the daily value needed.

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Some foods contain compounds that help keep your brain functioning well, while others lack any of the nutrition needed to promote mental health.

And you may be surprised by some foods that can help improve your state of mind, which should definitely be added to your diet, according to what the health website “everydayhealth” says.

the strawberry

• According to research published at RUSH University, a compound in strawberries called pelargonidine, is very beneficial for brain health, as it is associated with reducing tau proteins, which is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease.

• There is not enough evidence to determine how many strawberries a person needs to eat to achieve a benefit for the brain, but it is likely that eating half a cup of the sweet fruit a day is very good.

black lentils

• A study published in the journal Neurology found that adults who eat at least half a serving of foods rich in plant flavonoids each day have a 20% lower risk of cognitive decline.

• Black lentils, like all legumes, are an excellent source of dietary fiber, the lack of which leads to endangering long-term brain function.

eggs

• Eggs, and more specifically egg yolks, are the richest source of choline, which is a building block for a special class of fats called phospholipids found in cell membranes.

• Eggs occupies the second place in containing choline after beef liver, as one egg provides about 30% of the daily needs of choline, which benefits the brain.

spinach

• Spinach is particularly high in carotenoid antioxidants, including beta-carotene and lutein.

• One study found that middle-aged participants with higher levels of lutein had neurological responses that were more on par with younger individuals.

• Carotenoids, the yellow, orange and red pigments found in many antioxidant fruits and vegetables, help ward off accelerated oxidative damage to brain cells.

soybean

• Eating protein is not only beneficial for building lean muscle, but it is also a potential way to delay brain decline and slow the onset of dementia.

• Adult men and women who ate more protein than carbohydrates over several years had lower scores in hesitant cognitive performance.

• You can soak whole soybeans, cook them, leave them to ferment, and then prepare them in the form of a pancake. Eating them will give you an adequate share of the proteins needed for healthy cells.

avocado

• A study published in the journal “Nutrients” found that people who ate an avocado daily for 6 months experienced a significant improvement in memory and problem-solving efficiency.

• The investigators attributed the benefit to the high bioavailable levels of the antioxidant lutein in the cream fruit.

• Avocado is also rich in other elements like monounsaturated fats, folic acid, and fiber that can prevent your brain from aging.

matcha

• Matcha is derived from the tea plant made from shade-grown leaves that are ground into a fine powder.

• Contains nutrients and antioxidants that protect the brain, including flavonoids and phenols.

• Green tea and matcha provide a unique amino acid called L-theanine, which in higher amounts may be associated with cognitive improvements, including better performance on memory tasks.

canned sardines

• Sardines are one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which some research suggests may help slow age-related cognitive decline.

• An investigation published in “Nutrients” in 6,587 adults found that consuming fish, including sardines and salmon, and eating moderate omega-3 fats from marine sources, was associated with a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms.

• “The cell walls of our brains require healthy fats, including omega-3s, to function optimally,” says psychiatrist Bonnie J. Kaplan. “We don’t yet know the ideal amount of seafood needed for brain health, but a good suggestion is that Eating two portions of fatty fish per week.

• Canned sardines are a good source of “vitamin D” as well, providing a portion (100 grams) of 193 international units, or 24 percent of the daily value needed.


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